triathlon_article_Choosing_Living_Food

Choosing Living Food

Article written by Daniel Max, Holistic Health Counselor, Yoga Instructor, Shiatsu Practitioner, owner of Sense of Self

Triathlon Nutrition As individuals we have the choice of participating in our own health care. We can constantly discover new and healthy ways to nourish ourselves, connecting to our inner source of healing. We are more than just a physical body. Our body has an energy field of life force pulsing within and around it. Food gives us life so we need to eat foods that contain life as well. When we eat, we nourish ourselves to maintain our ‘life source,’ known in the East as Chi or Prana. When choosing food it is helpful to ask yourself the question “How close is this food to its original source of life?” In other words, how many processes has it passed through since it was harvested from a field? The more processed the food is, the less Prana, life force, it contains.

  • A vegetable picked today is more nutritious than a vegetable picked months ago, as it is still filled with the life soaked up from the earth and the sun. A freshly cooked vegetable has more life energy then a canned vegetable, as it has avoided factory processing.
  • However, a canned vegetable has far more life energy than a box of mac & cheese. Processed foods contain little or no energy. In fact they can cause more harm than good.
  • Whole grains are closer to their natural state then processed grains. For example brown rice is what white rice was prior to processing; therefore it is closer to the original state of growing in the fields.
  • Whole grain products do not equal whole grains. A bowl of oatmeal or high quality granola is less processed and therefore contains more life than a box of “whole grain cereal.” Whole grain cereals may be made from whole grains but they are no longer whole grains. As a processed product, they act more like sugar in the body rather than like grain.
  • Organic has more life energy than conventional, providing a higher content of vitamins and minerals due to factors such as the soil that is used.

Locally Grown Food

For those of us living locally in New England we are fortunate enough to enjoy the seasonal pleasures of local produce at the farmers markets. The selection at a farmers market is usually picked the same day, versus the produce found at a conventional grocery store that is often weeks or months old. If you have to ship a piece of fruit halfway around the world, it will contain far less vital energy than the fresh fruit you get from the farmer who drove in from the fields that same morning. Keep in mind that the closer to home the food was harvested, the fresher it is. When shopping at a conventional supermarket, look around the produce section; try to find foods that came from your state, or at least your country, not the other side of the globe.

An economical option is to buy lots of fresh food at the peak of its season and freeze, jar, or dry it for later use. Why not freeze your own fresh fruit or broccoli?

What’s Preferable; Local or Organic?

Organic foods imported from other countries will usually be more expensive than those from local farmers. Organic foods that are shipped long distances are also often picked when they are unripe. Since organic standards ban the use of fungicides, this allows the food to be transported long distances without spoiling. When fruits and vegetables are picked before they ripen, they contain fewer vitamins and minerals.

When shopping at a farmers market, you have the opportunity to find out from the farmers which treatments they have used on their crops. Many small farms grow their crops following organic standards, but do not get organically certified because of the cost.

When we eat locally grown foods we help the environment by minimizing the miles of greenhouse gases and carbon dioxide that it takes to get the foods transported. We are doing our part for both our local agriculture and the environment. Plus, it tastes better. Produce loses flavor on those long journeys.

TriathaNewbie.com Recommended Resources:

cateye



Triathlon Swim : – Get the low-down on gear and read tips for training and events.

Triathlon Bike: – Learn how to structure bike workouts, find safety tips and read recommendations on great bike gear.

Triathlon Run : – Get the ultimate skinny on running sneakers, running gear, safety tips and much more.

“Triathlete Profile
Read interviews of people like YOU who give advice on training, balance and much more.

There are Newbies Starting Triathlons Every Day. Today Just Happens to be YOUR Day!